South Florida Sunshine


#BlueGlassFL, Social Media, and Making Connections

Never doubt the power and value of the relationships in life and business.  Case in point, thanks in part to a series of serendipitous connections I decided to attend the BlueGlass FL conference.

This strange series of events started quite some time ago.  My mother-in-law was visiting us from Oklahoma, and she had never been to Key West.  So, we packed up the whole family and went on a little road trip for the day.  At dinner time I hopped on my personal Twitter account on my iPhone to comment on how much I enjoyed my afternoon in Key West and hoped to return soon for a longer visit.  A few minutes later a response came back from a complete stranger that I should consider staying longer than a weekend.  I love a good conversation, so I responded back.  That initial contact led to adding a tourist company in Key West as a social media client.

What does this have to do with BlueGlass?  Hold on, I’m getting to that.

But if you want the full story you will have to read it on my Social Media Blog.

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Pilate’s Cross – A Smashing E-Book

By Michelle Stinson Ross at One Writer’s Journey

“’The X-Files’ meets ‘The Prisoner’ when John Pilate, his sarcastic imaginary pal Simon and lovely instructor friend Kate investigate the mystery of a murdered college president–a mystery with loose ends more than 40 years later. In too deep to wash his hands of the mystery, he risks death to get to the truth of what really happened in 1963 and why it’s just as deadly 40 years later.”

From Smashwords.com

John Pilate’s life is a total disaster. His wife, Samantha, left him. He’s recovering from throat surgery after a cancer scare. Unemployed, broke, and off his anti-depressants, he’s desperately in need of a second chance. But second chances aren’t what they are cracked up to be when a new job offers the opportunity to start over again. The tiny township of Cross is anything but the sleepy little college town it seems to be. The loose ends of a 40 year old murder/suicide are triggering some strange events. The crypt of a prominent family is desecrated, and the local mortician is beat within an inch of his life. An outsider with no chance of ever fitting in, John Pilate finds himself in deep and will risk his life to uncover the truth in this gripping murder mystery by J. Alexander Greenwood.

For me, Pilate’s Cross was a total winner. When I first read it several months ago, I was along for the ride with John Pilate, the title character. I was as in the dark as much as he was. Greenwood kept me guessing until the very end. I picked it up a second time to review and was thrilled all over again. Greenwood weaves a depth of detail throughout the book that can only be caught on a second reading once you know what’s really going on. Full of humor and oh-so-quotable quips, it’s a no-brainer e-book purchase.

The one shortcoming for me was that I can’t get it in print. I’m an old school book lover, and I will never let go of the joy of holding those lovely pages in my hands. Pilate’s Cross would certainly be a book I’d plunk down the coin to have it in print. But I can’t complain too much, thanks to Smashwords.com, I have it on my iPhone, and I can take it with me everywhere I go.  It’s also available on Sony E-Reader, BarnesandNoble.com, iBooks, and Kobo.com

Author J. Alexander Greenwood

Mr. Greenwood is currently putting the finishing touches on the follow-up to this thriller. Believe me, I will be clicking the option to buy Pilate’s Key as soon as it’s available. Hurry up Alex. I can’t wait to see what mayhem you bring to Key West!

If you’re ever down in Key West, here are some suggestions on where to pick up more great books.

Key West: Where to Find the Perfect Beach Book


Via Key West – Bring Funky and Fabulous Home

Ever have those days at work when you just want to run away?  Would even a few hours of sandy beaches and frothy drinks do your mind good?  Wouldn’t it be nice to have a few reminders of that last trip to Key West at home?  Of course the answer to all these questions is, YES!!!

My dear friend, Lisa Malcom, has the cure for your ills.  Well, okay, maybe a really good band-aid until you can get back to Key West.  I’d certainly call it the next-best-thing to being here.

Lisa is a long time resident of Key West, and an island style entrepenure.  Her website www.viakeywest.com brings all that is funky and fabulous about this little tropical paradise to anyone anywhere in the world.

Maybe what you need is a tropical treat, something to remind you of the famous Key Lime Pie.  Why not order one of Oprah’s favorite things, the Key Lime Bundt Cake?  Personally, I’m all about the chocolate.  Via Key West has an absolutely amazing Triple Chocolate Chip Fudge Cake.  Let’s all pause a moment while the chocoholics take care of where they just drooled all over the keyboard.

Maybe you’d like to recapture the memories of good times with friends hanging out on Duval Street? I bet a little live music from Yankee Jack would bring back all sorts of fond memories.

What about all of the beautiful historic homes and places that make Key West so unique?  Don’t you wish you had picked up some art in one of the galleries?  ViaKeyWest.com has a fantastic assortment of photography, water colors, and mixed media art to choose from.

Maybe you need something sentamental for that someone special you’d like to remind of lazy days falling in love and watching the sunset together.  How about a lovely pearl bracelet to remind her of long walks on sandy beaches?

And what if you haven’t made it to visit Key West and are waiting for the opportunity to go? Via Key West has several books to help keep the dream alive.  There are books to help plan your destination wedding, tales of what it’s like to live here, and even a book on how to “Quit Your Job and Move to Key West.” 

So take a break and satisfy that need for something uniquely Key West.  You’ll be so glad you did.

If you enjoyed this post, you might also like …

Key West: Where to Find the Perfect Beach Book

Key West: The Ultimate Art Colony


KEY WEST: SHIPWRECKS SHELLS SQUARES & SUNSETS – Guest Post

THANKS FOR VISITING!!!

Today we continue with part 4 of our 5 part special photo walk feature of Key West as presented by our friend, photographer, designer, and blogger Lynda Quintero-Davids.  Join us as we share Lynda’s inspiring viewpoint in this installment entitled: Key West: Shipwrecks, Shells, Squares, & Sunsets.

While putting together this series this week, I’ve learned about all the industries Key West has thrived on – some of which were: fishing, turtling, sponging, pineapples, cigars and pink gold: shrimp (from the GULF). One of the most surprising factoids I discovered was learning about how Key West was once the RICHEST city in the United States. How did they achieve such wealth & status? Back in 1828, Key West thrived on the salvaging of shipwrecks, which was known as the wrecking industry…

Photos above I captured at Mallory Square and edited on picnik.com

“Long established trade routes came close to the Florida coast and the reefs just seven miles offshore of Key West. Stormy weather, or a captain’s inexperience with this treacherous area, could easily cause ships with valuable cargoes to founder just off shore. As a result, wrecking and salvaging soon became the island’s primary business and its citizenry became wealthy on the proceeds. Storehouses and chandeliers abounded, and people came from all over to bid on the valuable salvaged items. Between 1828 and the 1850s, Key West was considered the richest city, per capita, in the United States.”

(Learn more about the history of Key West here.)

The Shell Warehouse at Mallory Square was a great little find because for our past three anniversaries, we’ve spent them on the Florida shores (Key Largo, Naples, and now – Key West). I’ve been collecting treasures of coral, starfish and shells from our trips. This shop – by far – has had not only great prices, but a wonderful selection – I may even turn the photos into coastal wall art… (click to read more and see the rest of Lynda’s photos for this segment)

For more information about planning your Key West activities as well as booking them please just ask me either by leaving a comment, by email, or on Twitter. I would be happy to help!


Tour Key West by Jet Ski

Summer is officially here! Of course here at the Southernmost Point of the continental United States, it has felt like summer for quite some time. When it heats up like this, I start searching for ways to cool off.

One way in particular will not only cool you off but I promise will be the ride of your life. Taking a jet ski out into the gorgeous waters off our little slice of paradise is a total blast, but I need to give you a few tips to make sure that you have the time of your life.

There are a LOT of companies here in Key West that offer jet ski rentals, but beware, not all jet ski companies are created equal. Unfortunately there are some “fly-by-night” folks around here that truly are here today and gone tomorrow. It’s always best to educate yourself so that you spend your time and money wisely.

Things that you should be on the look out for:
– If the deal seems a little too good to be true; it most likely is.
– Don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions. Make sure that the equipment is in good shape and well-maintained.
– If you are going to rent a jet ski to ride on your own, be sure you understand how big a riding area you are allowed to navigate in. Several places won’t let you out of sight of their operations base and give you a very limited area to ride in.
– If you decided after arriving here that you want to go for a ride, don’t be shy to ask around about where to go. The locals know which companies will treat you right.

Having said all that, I do have 3 companies that I like very much. They aren’t the only reputable jet ski businesses in town, but these 3 do have a very consistent track record.

In no particular order:

Barefoot Billy’s

Billy’s now has two locations. They are located at the south end of Simonton Street, on the Atlantic side of Key West, right next to The Reach Resort and at the Key West Marriott Beachside Hotel on the North Western tip of the island on the Gulf side. They provide both jet ski rentals and an amazing jet ski tour. Billy prides himself on making sure that his guests have a great time. To that end, all of Barefoot Billy’s staff are helpful, friendly, and very knowledgable. I have had several guests come back and tell me that the tour exceeded their expectations.

Check out this video to get an idea of what it’s like to go for an adventure with Barefoot Billy’s:

Fury Water Adventures

Fury is located at the far North end of Duval Street very near Mallory Square. They have surf shops and kiosks all over the island, so trust me, you won’t have any trouble finding them. They offer a ton of great activities and I have to say that they have a unique twist on jet ski fun.

They offer a day trip called the Ultimate Adventure that includes jet skiing, parasailing snorkeling, and kayaking. The trip sets sail on a 65′ Catamaran at 10:00 AM. They serve breakfast while you make your way out to the reef for snorkeling. Then another sail takes you to Fury’s adventure island for a picnic lunch and jet skiing, parasailing, and kayaking. This trip is a total blast, especially if you want to try out several water sports.

Island Water Sports

This group is located in the marina at the Westin Resort, not far from Fury. Like Barefoot Billy’s, they offer jet ski rentals and an island tour. What’s really cool, in my mind, is that since they are located on the other side of the island from Billy’s you can get a great view of the sunset as you wind up your afternoon cruise. Again customer service is top-notch and they will take great care of you.

For more information about planning any Key West activities as well as bookings please just ask me either by leaving a comment, by email, or on Twitter. I would be happy to help!

Related articles of possible interest:

Key West Beaches
Key West: The Family Friendly Side


Key West – Blue By You – Photo Walk Guest Post part 3

Bio picToday we continue with part 3 of our 5 part special photo walk feature of Key West as presented by our friend, photographer, designer, and blogger Lynda Quintero-Davids.  Join us as we share Lynda’s inspiring viewpoint in this installment entitled: Key West Color Blocks Blue By You.

Just a play on words for Hurricane Season and the color of the season: BLUE … A color block post packed with so many blues to discover down in Key West: Caribbean and cool water blues, Gulf and pool aquamarine blues, navy and news blues, teals and turquoise blues, baby and sky blues, and peek-a-boo-blue … And mind you, this was unintentional. I was … (click to  read more and see the rest of Lynda’s photos for this segment) Key West T-Shirt Factory doors Key West colors
For more information about planning your Key West activities as well as booking them please just ask me either by leaving a comment, by email, or on Twitter. I would be happy to help!


Key West Taking Oil Spill Cleanup Into Own Hands – Repost from Tonic

The wonderful folks at Tonic.com have given me permission to pass on this fabulous article by Katie Leavitt originally posted on Tonic TUESDAY, JUNE 15, 2010 6:00 AM ET

Tired of waiting for BP or the government to do something, Florida Keys residents are organizing on their own terms.

The sunsets. The famous lineage of writers and artists. Key West is the southernmost tip of the United States, and at more than 100 miles from the mainland, the island has a unique culture all its own.

The community and location of Key West naturally lends itself to a strong state of independence, and when it comes to protecting their beloved ocean, coral reefs and plant and wildlife, these islanders will not take the laid-back approach.

The citizens of Key West are not happy with the way BP has approached the cleanup of Deepwater Horizon’s oil spill. With the possibility of the oil reaching Key West in the next few weeks, residents have decided to organize their own efforts. They are choosing to focus on preventative measures rather than wait around for the oil to reach their shores before any action takes place.

This is where Key West residents have an issue with BP and the bureaucratic red tape that makes it nearly impossible to take early steps. For example, BP’s Deepwater Horizon’s Unified Command, working with the US Coast Guard, demands that it maintain complete control over cleanup actions.

Despite regulations, thousands of volunteers and hundreds of boat captains have signed up to help out through the site KeysSpill.com. However, BP insists that boat captains can only contribute by signing up through their own Unified Command’s Vessels of Opportunity program. Dan Robey, owner of KeysSpill, told Time that he thinks the BP program is a complete waste, with only a third of their boats prepared for service.

The island community is determined to begin protecting their ecosystem no matter what, but are trying to work out a few kinks with BP. So far progress has been limited to the hiring of one sentry boat operator and the offer to pay up to $10,000 for the mandatory hazmat training needed before volunteers can deal with the oil.

Clearly, residents feel they must be prepared to take matters into their own hands. After all, many of the local fisherman, scientists and area natives have extensive knowledge about the corals and ocean life that are unique to the waters surrounding the island.

In addition to Robey’s volunteers, Adopt a Mangrove is assigning kayakers their own mangrove tree to clean. Florida Keys Environmental Coalition was born in order to connect environmental activists, scientists and boat captains, while volunteers are already working to clean up the beaches so they are easier to clean should oil the arrive.

Patrick Rice, dean of marine science and technology at Florida Keys Community College, has another plan he wants to see implemented. By placing air hoses with holes into the water, the air bubbles would block at least some of the oil from reaching the reefs and mangroves.

The people of the Keys, no matter what protocols may be in place, are determined to do all they can to be prepared for possible oil damage. “I just talked with BP yesterday,” Rice told Time. “I told them flat out, ‘If you come down here and start doing what you’ve done in Louisiana, you’re going to have a revolt. They’ll shut down U.S. 1. You won’t be able to bring any of your contractors in or out.'”


Key West: By Land, Sea, and Air

A major part of vacation planning for any destination is determining how to get there. Key West offers transportation opportunities unlike any land-locked locale. There are many options by sea, land, and air that make the journey a grand part of the adventure.

For hundreds of years the only way to reach the little island, once known as Cayo Hueso or “Bone Island,” was by sea. Long before Christopher Columbus unrolled his beach towel in the New World, the Caribbean natives often used it as a fishing outpost. Today, hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world visit our little paradise coming in by cruise ship. Major cruise providers like Royal Caribbean, Carnival, Celebrity, Disney and Norwegian offer a Key West port of call for several of their cruises. You can also visit on cruises by P&O Cruises, Costa, and MSC Cruises.

A favorite mode of transportation, especially for guests coming from Florida’s Gulf Coast, is the Key West Express ferry from Ft. Meyers. The Express currently operates four of the most modern vessels operating in the Florida tourist business. All of the vessels feature air-conditioned interiors, sun decks, a full galley and bar, large flat screen TVs with satellite programming, and knowledgeable crews with years of experience.  Step aboard for a quick trip with travel journalist Chris Kohatsu
Video production by Brock Media.

For travelers lucky enough to own thier own sea-going vessels, there are several marinas to tie off in.  The Westin Key West Marina offers a 37-slip marina that can accommodate motor yachts from 25-200 feet. Electric and water hookups are available at each slip. Please contact the Marina Dock Master for availability and fees.  Oceanside Marina is made up of 96 slips of various sizes from 40’ to 80’ and T heads for larger craft. Owners of slips must be contacted directly about availability for lease or sale.  Sunset Marina offers 30′, 40′, 50′, 60′ slips for sale and lease with easy Access to Gulf of Mexico or Atlantic Ocean. The Conch Harbor Marina has  annual, monthly and transient dockage available.  Garrison Bight Marina is the only dry storage facility in Key West and offers quick boating access to the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Ocean or the lovely backcountry and flats.  And finally the Key West Yacht Club Marina is located off the pristine shoreline of the Atlantic Ocean, far enough from the mainland for a relaxing island escape yet close enough to enjoy the shopping and attractions that Key West is famous for.

Inspired by the announcement of plans to build the Panama Canal, Henry Flagler began to build his Overseas Rail Road in 1905 with his own money.  From start to finish the project was plagued with difficulty, danger, and disaster, but Flagler persevered through 7 grueling years of construction.  This from an article on FloridaKeys.com:

Flagler’s associates wanted him to realize his dream of riding his private railroad car into Key West. But, time was running out as he was getting old. His 82nd birthday party was postponed for a few weeks so that he could celebrate it with the completion of the project. At 10:43 a.m. on January 22, 1912, engine number 201 safely delivered Flagler and his wife in his private car, Rambler, for three days of celebration in Key West. As tears were streaming down his face, he said, “Now I can die happy. My dream is fulfilled.”

On Labor Day in 1935 a powerful hurricane dealt a deathblow. Hundreds of people in the Islamorada area lost their lives and 40 miles of railroad track were washed out. The railroad’s right-of-way was sold to the State of Florida for $640,000, and would become what is now the Overseas Highway.

The roadway was originally completed in 1938 and incorporates 42 bridges over the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Florida Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. They include the Seven Mile Bridge at Marathon, which stretches 6.79 miles across open water and was referred to on its completion as “the eighth wonder of the world.”

Driving through the Keys on the Overseas Highway is still one of my favorite activities.  Cruising along at a leisurely pace, passing between sheltered little communities and wide open ocean vistas is a treat all to itself.  Then you hit Seven Mile Bridge and the wide open vistas of sea and sky.  Even as early as 4:00 in the afternoon, the clouds begin to take on a slight pink blush, hinting as to what awaits in Key West.  If you really want to experience the drive to it’s fullest, I highly recommend renting a convertible.  The speed limits are strictly controlled and range from 35 to 45 miles per hour throughout the Keys, perfect for a top down cruise.  Just be sure to put on some sunscreen before you hit the open road.  From Miami, the drive will take around 3 hours, from Ft. Lauderdale a little closer to 4 hours. Once in Key West, you will not be using that rental car much. If you are staying in Old Town, the historic quarter, most everything is within a short, charming walk. Many guests return their car at the airport, take advantage of bicycles, scooters or electric cars on the island, and pick another one back up at the end of their week.

Of course, the quickest way to get here is by air.  KeyWestTravelGuide.com says this about air travel:

Daily flights by a handful of major airlines bring in many passengers from all over the world. The airlines that service Key West are Delta, American, US Air, Cape Air, and Continental. For most every air traveler, you will change to a smaller plane in South Florida, for the final leg to Key West. Since our airport is small, expect your connecting flight to Key West to be on a small plane, often referred to as a “puddle jumper”. Almost all of these flights originate from either: Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, Tampa, or Orlando. The one airline offering an out-of-state flight is Delta’s Atlanta-Key West route…a route that is especially desirable for those in the Peachtree State. If you fly during daylight, the view of the Florida Keys is breathtaking.

Lady walking from jetIf you’re interested in really traveling in style, you might want to consider a private air taxi charter with Aviator Services.  Service in their 2009 Cirrus SR22 is now available in South Florida, based at Miami’s Tamaimi Airport. Get to where you need to go in Florida quickly. The Cirrus cruises at nearlyCirrus SR22 200 MPH. Enjoy Bose Quiet Headsets and XM Radio, a roomy cabin and seating for 3 passengers. It’s like flying in a luxury sedan with wings! Call 305-234-8800 to inquire about their affordable rates.

No matter whether you choose to travel by sea, land, or air, you’re sure to find that getting to Key West truly is half the fun!

For more information about planning any Key West activities as well as bookings please just ask me either by leaving a comment, by email, or on Twitter. I would be happy to help!

Related articles of possible interest:

Key West, Touring in an Electric Car


Key West, Hurricane Season, and the Oil Spill

Hurricane season is now officially at its beginning for this year.  The massive storms are a fact of life that the residents of Key West are always at the ready to deal with.  But what about the presence of so much oil in the Gulf of Mexico right now?  What will the oil spill contribute, if anything, to the damage that hurricanes are capable of causing?

As always, I still think that the best way to deal with such issues is to get yourself educated.  The worst thing we can do is give into the media hype and hit the panic button.  To reach that goal of more education, I thought I would share a little information that is available from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The following is from the NOAA Fact Sheet on Hurricanes and Oil Spills:

What will happen to a hurricane that runs through this oil slick?

Most hurricanes span an enormous area of the ocean (200-300 miles) — far wider than the current size of the spill.  If the slick remains small in comparison to a typical hurricane’s general environment and size, the anticipated impact on the hurricane would be minimal.  The oil is not expected to appreciably affect either the intensity or the track of a fully developed tropical storm or hurricane.  The oil slick would have little effect on the storm surge or near-shore wave heights.

What will the hurricane do to the oil slick in the Gulf?

The high winds and seas will mix and “weather” the oil which can help accelerate the biodegradation process.  The high winds may distribute oil over a wider area, but it is difficult to model exactly where the oil may be transported.  Movement of oil would depend greatly on the track of the hurricane.  Storms’ surges may carry oil into the coastline and inland as far as the surge reaches. Debris resulting from the hurricane may be contaminated by oil from the Deepwater Horizon incident, but also from other oil releases that may occur during the storm.  A hurricane’s winds rotate counter-clockwise.

Thus, in VERY GENERAL TERMS:
o A hurricane passing to the west of the oil slick could drive oil to the coast.
o A hurricane passing to the east of the slick could drive the oil away from the coast.
o However, the details of the evolution of the storm, the track, the wind speed, the size, the forward motion and the intensity are all unknowns at this point and may alter this general statement.

Will the oil slick help or hurt a storm from developing in the Gulf?

Evaporation from the sea surface fuels tropical storms and hurricanes. Over relatively calm water (such as for a developing tropical depression or disturbance), in theory, an oil slick could suppress evaporation if the layer is thick enough, by not allowing contact of the water to the air.   With less evaporation one might assume there would be less moisture available to fuel the hurricane and thus reduce its strength.  However, except for immediately near the source, the slick is very patchy. At moderate wind speeds, such as those found in approaching tropical storms and hurricanes, a thin layer of oil such as is the case with the current slick (except in very limited areas near the well) would likely break into pools on the surface or mix as drops in the upper layers of the ocean. (The heaviest surface slicks, however, could re-coalesce at the surface after the storm passes.)  This would allow much of the water to remain in touch with the overlying air and greatly reduce any effect the oil may have on evaporation. Therefore, the oil slick is not likely to have a significant impact on the hurricane.

Will the hurricane pull up the oil that is below the surface of the Gulf?

All of the sampling to date shows that except near the leaking well, the subsurface dispersed oil is in parts per million levels or less. The hurricane will mix the waters of the Gulf and disperse the oil even further.

Have we had experience in the past with hurricanes and oil spills?

Yes, but our experience has been primarily with oil spills that occurred because of the storm, not from an existing oil slick and an ongoing release of oil from the seafloor.  The experience from hurricanes Katrina and Rita (2005) was that oil released during the storms became very widely dispersed.  Dozens of significant spills and hundreds of smaller spills occurred from offshore facilities, shoreside facilities, vessel sinkings, etc.

Will there be oil in the rain related to a hurricane?

No. Hurricanes draw water vapor from a large area, much larger than the area covered by oil, and rain is produced in clouds circulating the hurricane.

Learn more about NOAA’s response to the BP oil spill at

http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/deepwaterhorizon.

To learn more about NOAA, visit
http://www.noaa.gov.


Key West Photo Series Guest Blog Part 2

Bio picMy friend, Lynda Quintero-Davids, is back with part two of her Key West series.  This amazing photographer, designer, and blogger recently visited Key West and has a wonderful viewpoint to share.  I hope you enjoy this installment in a taste of:

THE HOUSES OF KEY WEST PART 2 – Hurricane Alley and America’s Southernmost Point

With the start of summer also comes the start of Hurricane Season. And like a carrot dangling in front of a rabbit, so is Key West. Builders far and wide come to Key West (and some should) to study its resilient architecture to learn how these homes have withstood hurricanes, termites, neglect and even the Great Depression. I too am learning about its style & architecture… Here’s some of what I’ve found, along with some photos I captured from our recent anniversary trip to Key West

Love the painted underside of the portico…
On Simonton gingerbread details and painted shutters
More details on Duval
Grand architecture of a conch house

One of the most recognizable architecture styles of Key West homes are simple shotgun homes (aka cigar makers house) and which can also be found in New Orleans architecture. Simple shotgun style Key West architecture traces its origin to West Africa and the French Caribbean. These balloon-frame homes for cigar makers were small and simple, one story and one room wide — with three rooms end to end so a shot fired from the front door could exit the back door without resistance.

Oh so coastal…

One of the more famous cigar houses of Key West was actually converted into a historic cottage inn called Simonton Court, and is located on Hurricane Alley. Cigar houses were established by Englishman William Hall in 1831 and the Cubans. The cigar industry was one of the three main thriving economies at the start of Key West’s history (wrecking industry*, sponge industry (from the Bahamians) and cigar industry (from the Cubans). I would have thought that with Key West having been so heavily populated with Cubans, the roof tops would have been finished with Cuban barrel tile (shaped on the leg of a woman), but because of fires, many roof tops were constructed of tin to deflect flying embers.

Although many of the houses were constructed of wood, over time and devastation from havoc of not only hurricanes but fires, buildings were also constructed of concrete or brick.  A portion of this brick can still be found at an old cigar house turned inn called Simonton Court.  If you’ve picked up a Summer Catalog from Pottery Barn this year, you’ve already been introduced to Simonton Court, and if not, you can learn more about Pottery Barn’s photo shoot in the Florida Keys here.
“Simonton Court is a group of very unique rooms,
created from an old cigar makers’ factory –

No two are alike, but each are charming.”
Simonton Court Resort
“A brick walkway, once a lane,
runs past sparkling pools and historic cottages
built in 1880 as the homes of cigar factory workers.”
Pineapples – the symbol of “Welcome”
are a prominent decor detail throughout Key West

Simonton Court resides on Simonton Street, which is said to be also named Hurricane Alley. Simonton Street was named after the purchaser of the island, John W. Simonton. Although he purchased the island in January 1822, he was deemed the legal owner of the island (Key West aka Cayo

Hueso) until May 1828. His story is actually a part Florida’s first land scam. Learn more about the history of Key West here.

For the rest of Linda’s beautiful photography and commentary please visit her blog “FOCAL POINT”

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